Indie News

Sundance: Sony Worldwide Acquisitions Nabs Debra Granik's 'Leave No Trace' (Exclusive)

Sundance: Sony Worldwide Acquisitions Nabs Debra Granik's 'Leave No Trace' (Exclusive)
Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions has acquired all international rights to Debra Granik's Leave No Trace.

The film is a haunting father-daughter story featuring Ben Foster and newcomer Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie, presented by Bron Creative and Topic Studios.

Based on Peter Rock's novel My Abandonment, the film revolves around a teenage girl (Harcourt McKenzie) and her father (Foster) who have lived undetected for years in Forest Park, a vast woods on the edge of Portland, Oregon. A chance encounter leads to their discovery and removal from the park and into the charge of a social service agency. They try to adapt...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Jason Blum’s Advice To Burgeoning Producers At Sundance: ‘Don’t Worry About Your Movie Getting A Theatrical Release’

Jason Blum’s Advice To Burgeoning Producers At Sundance: ‘Don’t Worry About Your Movie Getting A Theatrical Release’
What a year it’s been for producer and Blumhouse boss Jason Blum. A year ago during Sundance, he had the top grossing title at the weekend box office, M. Night Shyamalan’s Split which with $40M marked the fifth best ever opening for January. And Blum also sneaked the world premiere of Get Out here at Sundance, which off $4.5M production cost reaped close to $255M and stands on the precipice of potential Oscar noms this Tuesday. This morning Blum was the keynote speaker at…
See full article at Deadline »

Puppy Movie ‘Pick of the Litter’ Sells to IFC’s Sundance Selects

Puppy Movie ‘Pick of the Litter’ Sells to IFC’s Sundance Selects
IFC FilmsSundance Selects label has acquired North American rights to Slamdance’s resident adorable film “Pick of the Litter.” The documentary was directed by Dana Nachman and Don Hardy, and follows a litter of puppies from birth as they train to become seeing eye dogs for the blind. “Everyone at IFC Films/Sundance Selects understands how dogs can change one’s life and this film epitomizes this,” Arianna Bocco, the unit’s head of acquisitions and production, said in a statement. “We are so excited to introduce these amazing animals to audiences.” Also Read: 'Tyrel': Race, Class and Bad Manners Collide in Showcase for Jason Mitchell Nachman’s...
See full article at The Wrap »

Behind the Scenes at Sundance: a Star-Filled Women's Rally, Fun Sightings and More

  • PEOPLE.com
Behind the Scenes at Sundance: a Star-Filled Women's Rally, Fun Sightings and More
Another year, another fun-filled 10 days are happening at the Sundance Film Festival in snowy Park City, Utah — and People is there to capture all the behind-the-scenes action.

Celebrities like Dakota Fanning, Jane Fonda, Nicholas Cage and more are braving the frigid weather and flocking to the small town this weekend to interact with their biggest fans and hit up some of the festival’s hottest parties.

Thursday, Jan. 18

2:35 p.m.: Blythe Danner arrives in Salt Lake City, Utah, where she is greeted by a swarm of photographers and fans asking for autographs. “Why do I deserve all this attention?
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Charlize Theron, Jason Reitman & Diablo Cody Reteam ‘Tully’ Is Sundance Secret Screening

Charlize Theron, Jason Reitman & Diablo Cody Reteam ‘Tully’ Is Sundance Secret Screening
Exclusive: This year’s secret screening is director Jason Reitman and screenwriter Diablo Cody's Tully, a comedy which is their second collaboration with Charlize Theron after 2011’s Young Adult. The Focus Features release opens on April 20. In Tully, Theron plays Marlo, a mother of three including a newborn, who is gifted a night nanny by her brother. Hesitant to accept the extravagance at first, Marlo comes to form a unique bond with the thoughtful, surprising, and…
See full article at Deadline »

Sundance: ‘Colette’ Sells to 30West, Bleecker Street

Sundance: ‘Colette’ Sells to 30West, Bleecker Street
Bleecker Street and 30West have partnered to buy “Colette,” a drama about the famous French writer that stars Keira Knightley following the film’s Sundance Film Festival premiere.

The deal is said to be in the mid-seven figures. The companies are said to be eyeing a traditional theatrical release at some point in 2018. It marks the first significant acquisition of this year’s festival — a market that’s been moving at a glacial pace with buyers complaining that the slate is arty and lacking in commercial heft.

“Colette” co-stars Dominic West, Fiona Shaw, and Denise Gough. It was directed by Wash Westmoreland (“Still Alice”). The film follow Colette as she emerges as the toast of Belle Epoque society with her sexually charged Claudine novels. At the same time, Colette struggles to be recognized for her work. Her husband, the writer Willy, takes credit for the novels.

In a largely favorable review, Variety’s [link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

PGA Awards: ‘The Shape Of Water’ Wins Outstanding Producer; ‘Handmaid’s Tale’, ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Tops In TV – Full Winners List

PGA Awards: ‘The Shape Of Water’ Wins Outstanding Producer; ‘Handmaid’s Tale’, ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Tops In TV – Full Winners List
Updated with final results: Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water solidified its status as an Oscar Best Picture frontrunner in a season where there are several, taking home the top honor at the 29th annual PGA Awards tonight at the Beverly Hilton. On the TV side, a pair of streaming series rookies — Amazon’s comedy The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Hulu’s drama The Handmaid’s Tale — came away with marquee honors. Del Toro, who won the Best Director Golden Globe already…
See full article at Deadline »

Ben Stiller to Direct Jonah Hill in Adaptation of Sundance-Winning Documentary ‘We Live in Public’ — Sundance 2018

  • Indiewire
Ben Stiller to Direct Jonah Hill in Adaptation of Sundance-Winning Documentary ‘We Live in Public’ — Sundance 2018
Ondi Timoner’s 2009 Sundance Grand Jury Prize-winning documentary, “We Live in Public,” will become a feature film directed by Ben Stiller and starring Jonah Hill as Josh Harris, the dot-com millionaire who carried out a surveillance experiment with 150 residents at a Manhattan hotel amid Y2K panic.

Bold Films will finance the project, which Timoner will produce with Stiller’s Red Hour Films. Timoner announced the project during an interview at a January 20, Dell-sponsored panel, “Life After Sundance — Building a Career in Indie Filmmaking.”

Timoner also briefly discussed “Mapplethorpe,” her just-completed biopic of Robert Mapplethorpe with “The Crown” star Matt Smith in the lead. She said Sundance accepted the film for the 2018 festival, but it hit “a bump” that prevented its screening.

Read More: Portraying Chaos: Ondi Timoner’s “We Live In Public” (Sundance ’09)

Red Hour Films CEO Nicky Weinstock told IndieWire that “We Live In Public” will be penned
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance Scene and Heard: Black Eyed Peas, Issa Rae, Joaquin Phoenix and More (Photos)

Sundance Scene and Heard: Black Eyed Peas, Issa Rae, Joaquin Phoenix and More (Photos)
Ethan Hawke deserved to kick back after making the rounds for two films at Sundance Friday night, “Blaze,” which he wrote and directed, and “Juliet, Naked,” which he stars in. But Lena Waithe and Issa Rae did anything but that at Showtime’s party at the IMDb Studio for Waithe’s new series “The Chi.” How is Nic Cage so cool? Remember, he is a Coppola. Before a midnight screening of “Mandy,” on Friday night (Jan. 19), Cage and Kevin Smith held the early lead for one of the top shots of the festival so far. What are the Black Eyed Peas doing...
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Sorry to Bother You’ Star Tessa Thompson: Hollywood Hesitates to Cast Black Actors in Magical Realism Films — Sundance 2018

‘Sorry to Bother You’ Star Tessa Thompson: Hollywood Hesitates to Cast Black Actors in Magical Realism Films — Sundance 2018
Tessa Thompson was at Sundance four years ago for the premiere of “Dear White People,” a film that slingshotted her career — she’s now a veteran of blockbusters (“Creed,” “Thor: Ragnarok”), a Best Picture nominee (“Selma”), a HBO hit (“Westworld”), and a Jay-z music video (“Moonlight”). Now she’s returning to Park City with another feature tackling race, Boots Riley’s “Sorry to Bother You,” in which a black telemarketer (Lakeith Stanfield) suddenly prospers when he learns to mimic a white person’s voice. Thompson will see the finished product for the first time at the January 20 premiere.

Over a fireside chat with Oscar-winning producer (“Crash”) and Women in Film, Los Angeles president Cathy Schulman, the actress, songwriter, and Time’s Up volunteer explained what drew her to the role. “I’ve long wanted to work in this space of magical realism in film,” she said. “I feel like for
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Get Out’ Producers Wanted Jordan Peele to Play TSA Agent Rod

‘Get Out’ Producers Wanted Jordan Peele to Play TSA Agent Rod
“Get Out” producer Sean McKittrick says he failed to convince writer-director Jordan Peele to take a pivotal role in his $250 million-grossing debut. “We tried to force him — not force him, but we tried to encourage him to play the part of Rod that was ultimately played by Lil Rel [Howery],” said McKittrick during a panel at the Producers Guild of America Nominees Breakfast on January 20.

Read More:Producers Guild Nominations Snubs and Surprises: ‘Wonder Woman,’ ‘I, Tonya’ Make the Grade, ‘Phantom Thread’ Doesn’t

Peele, then best-known for his work on the Comedy Central series “Key and Peele,” declined, stipulating, “‘The moment the audience sees my face, they’re not going to take [the film] seriously,'” said McKittrick, a partner at QC Entertainment. “He knew from the get-go how to keep the tone, which was very thin-ice throughout, it could veer off at any moment.”

In the film, Tsa agent Rob rescues his
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance 2018 Indie Episodic Preview: The Most Anticipated TV Pilots and Premieres at This Year’s Festival

Sundance 2018 Indie Episodic Preview: The Most Anticipated TV Pilots and Premieres at This Year’s Festival
Don’t let the title fool you: The Sundance Film Festival has been featuring television programs for years, be it the slew of documentaries that end up on HBO, Showtime, and Netflix or pilots that earn a special showcase like “Animals.” did in 2015.

But 2018 is special. This year, Sundance is dedicating an entire section to episodic programming, including short-form series, docu-series, traditional pilots, and more experimental premieres. It’s all coming together under the Indie Episodic banner, and it’s all designed with one clear mission:

“There is no clear path to series if you’re trying to do it independently — if you’re going to try and shoot your own pilot, and then try and get picked up,” Sundance programmer Charlie Sextro told IndieWire. “There’s a clear way [in] making an independent film: It gets picked up at Sundance, and then it gets out to the world. It’s
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘White Fang’ Review: Jack London’s Classic Story Is Vividly Reimagined in Lush Animated Offering

‘White Fang’ Review: Jack London’s Classic Story Is Vividly Reimagined in Lush Animated Offering
Jack London’s “White Fang,” the classic story of a wild wolf-dog rendered against the harsh environment of gold-rush Alaska, has spawned a number of cinematic adaptations — a well-regarded 1991 live-action feature starring Ethan Hawke, a 1993 animated series — but it’s in the hands of French animator Alexandre Espigares that the tale comes to its most vivid life. Adapted from London’s novel by a cadre of screenwriters (there are three listed in the film’s official press kit: Dominique Monfery, Philippe Lioret, and Serge Frydman), Espigares’ film captures the essence of London’s hard-knock story while reimagining it for a slightly younger audience (in short, it’s still traumatic, but not traumatic enough to drive away the audience who will also love it so very much).

That the film includes some star-studded voice talent for this American version (the film will be translated for a variety of territories), including Nick Offerman,
See full article at Indiewire »

Armie Hammer Was Very Generous With His Weed on ‘Sorry to Bother You’ — Watch

  • Indiewire
Armie Hammer Was Very Generous With His Weed on ‘Sorry to Bother You’ — Watch
Pretty much everyone besides James Woods loves Armie Hammer these days. Just ask the cast and crew of “Sorry to Bother You,” a racial satire that’s currently the talk of the town at Sundance. Speaking to Vulture, his castmates showered praise on the “Call Me by Your Name” star for his marijuana-related generosity on set.

Read More:‘Sorry to Bother You’: Armie Hammer Explains His Character from Sundance’s Craziest Debut

“The first time I saw him, he gave me some weed,” said Omari Hardwick, one of Hammer’s co-stars in the film. “Yeah, I heard you had weed too,” chimed in Tessa Thompson. As laughter took over the room, director Boots Riley took charge. “I’m gonna clear this up,” he said. “Omari was like, ‘Man, that Armie, he’s a cool dude. He just gave me all this weed as a gift.’ And when I saw Armie the next time,
See full article at Indiewire »

Carey Mulligan Talks About Being Directed by Longtime Friend and First-Time Filmmaker Paul Dano — Sundance

Carey Mulligan Talks About Being Directed by Longtime Friend and First-Time Filmmaker Paul Dano — Sundance
Friendly collaboration is a part of independent film, but it’s always At the IndieWire Sundance Studio presented by Dropbox, “Wildlife” star Carey Mulligan shared her experiences working with longtime friends Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan.

“There was a kind of triple threat of fear involved in working with people I’ve known as friends for a decade,” Mulligan said. “It was really amazing to be able to work with someone who understands acting so well and understands the holes that you get into when you can’t understand something or the problems that you have in the room, in the moment with that one line.”

Read More:‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Is on Fire in Paul Dano’s Stunningly Beautiful Directorial Debut — Sundance 2018

Mulligan stars in the film as Jeanette, a mother trying to keep her family intact after her husband leaves their Montana town to fight an out-of-control forest fire.
See full article at Indiewire »

Dp Kirsten Johnson on Filming the Kronos Quartet Documentary A Thousand Thoughts

Kirsten Johnson was among the most in-demand documentary DPs even before her much-celebrated 2016 film Cameraperson. Johnson has shot more than 50 films for such directors as Laura Poitras, Alex Gibney and Kirby Dick. Her latest film, A Thousand Thoughts, is a doc on the Kronos Quartet from directors Sam Green and Joe Bini. The film will be presented at Sundance as a “live documentary” with Green narrating live and the Quartet conducting the score in person. Before its premiere, Johnson spoke with Filmmaker about finding innovative ways to film a concert and how a shot from Cameraperson wound up in A […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Peter Dinklage Says It’s the ‘Perfect Time’ to End ‘Game of Thrones,’ and This Is Why

Peter Dinklage Says It’s the ‘Perfect Time’ to End ‘Game of Thrones,’ and This Is Why
Not unlike Tyrion Lannister, Peter Dinklage knows things. One of those things is the fact that “Game of Thrones” is indeed about to end. Speaking to Variety at Sundance, the Emmy winner said that it’s “the perfect time” for the show to conclude, lest it overstay its welcome. Watch below.

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“It’s time,” the actor said during a visit to Variety’s studio in Park City. “Story-wise, not just for all our lives. It’s the perfect time to end it. Sometimes shows stay on a little too long, the jumping-the-shark thing.”

“It’s bittersweet when it’s time to move on with everything,” Dinklage added. “It’s always the sad part of our business, because you get pockets of great people for short amounts of time and then you
See full article at Indiewire »

With Oscar Nominations Ahead, Specialized Releases Hold Their Breath at the Box Office

With Oscar Nominations Ahead, Specialized Releases Hold Their Breath at the Box Office
Tuesday’s Oscar nominations could add $100 million or more to the box office, but for now new titles don’t have much to say for themselves. In a non-holiday weekend, six titles grossed $31 million, down less than a quarter from last week. Still, that’s way up from last year, a period that was powered by the widely popular “Hidden Figures.”

A higher than usual number of new releases have yet to report numbers, perhaps with distributors more occupied with battles over future films than keeping track of their current entries.

Opening

Mary and the Witch’s Flower (GKids) – Metacritic: 75; Festivals include: AFI 2017

$1,497,000 in theaters; PTA (per theater average): $2,361

This Japanese animated adaptation of the popular’s children’s novel is Studio Ghibli in style if not actual production company. Niche distributor GKids, which most years has at least one Oscar nomination for animated film (less likely this year,
See full article at Indiewire »

Carey Mulligan Shines In Emotionally Distant ‘Wildlife’ [Sundance Review]

Sometimes actors can really direct. Case in point, Paul Dano. Having worked with masters of the form in his short but impressive career, Dano seems to have learned a lot from the likes of Steve McQueen, Denis Villeneuve, Paul Thomas Anderson and Rian Johnson. One would easily think that the 35-year-old actor, now turned filmmaker, looked closely and attentively at these filmmakers at work to prepare for his eventual debut, “Wildlife.” The result is a precise, controlled, but perhaps emotionally distant adaptation of Richard Ford’s short novel.

Continue reading Carey Mulligan Shines In Emotionally Distant ‘Wildlife’ [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘The Happy Prince’ Review: Oscar Wilde Is a Depressed Loner in Rupert Everett’s Humorless Biopic — Sundance 2018

‘The Happy Prince’ Review: Oscar Wilde Is a Depressed Loner in Rupert Everett’s Humorless Biopic — Sundance 2018
Most people know Oscar Wilde as the preeminent source of British wit, a high-society raconteur whose plays and novels epitomize what it means to be the life of the party. That characterization recedes to the shadows in “The Happy Prince,” in which Rupert Everett directs and stars as the flamboyant literary giant at the end of his life. Anyone expecting Wildean banter will be sorely disappointed — think more of an autobiographical spin on “The Portrait of Dorian Gray” than “The Importance of Being Earnest” — but it’s Everett’s formidable investment in the role that rescues the movie from being a total letdown. Nevertheless, “The Happy Prince” largely amounts to a bland rumination on Wilde’s lesser-known decline.

Read More:The 2018 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview, and News Item Posted During the Festival

The drama mostly takes place in 1867, shortly after Wilde was released from prison for “indecency with men.
See full article at Indiewire »
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